Seminars | This Week

Biological Sciences Seminar

Date/Time: Friday 26th August 2016 15:00

Location: Goddard room 139

Title of talk: Bacillus thuringiensis and insect-bacterial coevolutionary interactions on two time scales
Speaker's name: David Heckel
Speaker's organisation: Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Talk abstract: Bacillus thuringiensis and insect-bacterial coevolutionary interactions on two time scales

Other Details: If you would like to meet with the speaker, please contact the host.

Host name: Meron Zalucki
Host email: m.zalucki@uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

Biological Sciences Seminar

Date/Time: Friday 2nd September 2016 15:00

Location: Goddard room 139

Title of talk: The response of the Great Barrier Reef to major environmental changes over the past 125,000 years
Speaker's name: Jody Webster
Speaker's organisation: University of Sydney
Talk abstract: The response of the Great Barrier Reef to major environmental changes over the past 125,000 years

Other Details: If you would like to meet with the speaker, please contact the host.

Host name: John Pandolfi
Host email: j.pandolfi@uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

Last chance to apply for the IMB Research Advancement Award

Date/Time: Monday 29th August 2016 09:00

Location: Online

Title of talk: Kick-start your research career with a $30k top-up scholarship
Speaker's name: Applications close 5 September
Speaker's organisation: Don't miss out - apply now!
Talk abstract: APPLICATIONS ARE SOUGHT FROM TALENTED DOMESTIC STUDENTS WHO DEMONSTRATE:
> Excellence in academic achievement
> A passion for scientific research
> Independence and leadership potential
> Ability to communicate a love of science

RECEIVE an additional $30,000* career enrichment award on top of your APA or an equivalent scholarship.

Host name: IMB Postgraduate Office
Host email: postgrad-office@imb.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

SCMB Seminar

Date/Time: Wednesday 24th August 2016 12:00

Location: AIBN seminar room, (Bldg. 75 -Level 1 - Room 132)

Title of talk: On the temperature dependence of biological rates from enzymes to organisms to ecosystems
Speaker's name: Prof Vic Arcus
Speaker's organisation: University of Waikato
Talk abstract: Under a regime of increasing global temperature it is imperative that we have accurate models to predict how the biosphere will respond. The current mathematical functions used in global climate models are rather rudimentary and so there is lots of room for improvement. At first glance this effort may seem hopelessly complicated - we need mathematical functions to describer each of the different ecosystem processes - microbial respiration, photosynthesis, methanogenesis, plant respiration etc etc. Together with a group of environmental scientists, we have been applying functions that describe the temperature dependence of enzymes to systems at increasing scales - single cells, organisms, ecosystems. We have called this scheme macromolecular rate theory (MMRT). The seminar will introduce MMRT and then show how it scales up from enzymes to ecosystems and its potential utility for global climate models.

Other Details: If you would like to meet the speaker please contact Marina Fortes at m.fortes@uq.edu.au

Host name: Marina Fortes
Host email: m.fortes@uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

Cell Biology Forum

Date/Time: Wednesday 24th August 2016 09:00

Location: Large Seminar Room QBP

Title of talk: Manipulating innate immunity as an anti-infection approach - Targeting Histone deacetylase 6
Speaker's name: Ronan Kapetanovic
Speaker's organisation: IMB, UQ (Sweet lab)

Host name: Brett Collins
Host email: b.collins@imb.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

Cell Biology Forum

Date/Time: Wednesday 31st August 2016 09:00

Location: Large Seminar Room (QBP)

Title of talk: Live imaging of VE-cadherin tension in vascular development and disease
Speaker's name: Anne Lagendijk
Speaker's organisation: IMB, UQ (Hogan lab)

Host name: Brett Collins
Host email: b.collins@imb.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

QBI Neuroscience Seminar

Date/Time: Wednesday 24th August 2016 12:00

Location: Level 7 Auditorium

Title of talk: Analysis of information encoding and dynamics in optically recorded cortical circuits
Speaker's name: Dr Simon Schultz
Speaker's organisation: Head, Neural Coding Laboratory, Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College
Talk abstract: In recent years, technology for large-scale recording of neural circuit dynamics, at single cell resolution, has progressed extremely rapidly. Several international initiatives, including the US NIH BRAIN Initiative, mean that we are likely to see further developments, including the ability to manipulate as well as read out neural ensemble activity. As well as enhancing our understanding of numerous basic questions in systems neuroscience, we can hope that these techniques are likely to be of translational benefit, by allowing the characterisation of changes to circuit behaviour in mouse models of neurodegenerative disorders to be studied in great detail and across scales. Scalable data analysis tools capable of taking into consideration patterns of neural ensemble activity, however, become a limiting factor once neural population sizes exceed a few tens of neurons.

In the past, I have developed information theoretic methods for analysing how information is represented in spike trains fired by small ensembles of neurons. In this talk, I will describe several approaches we are taking to scale these approaches up to tens and hundreds of neurons recorded simultaneously through two photon calcium imaging. We take two quite different approaches. In the first approach, we consider the calcium time series from the neural ensemble as a multivariate continuous time series, and employ approaches from nonlinear dynamics, together with dimensionality reduction. In the second, we use a calcium transient detection algorithm to instead represent the data as a digitized multineuron spike train, and make strong but testable assumptions about the underlying variability. In the talk, I will describe the application of these methods to data from a number of cortical circuits: neocortical, archicortical (hippocampus) and the cerebellar cortical circuit.

Other Details: Students and postdocs are encouraged to have lunch with the seminar speaker
at 1.00pm in the Level 7 seminar room. Lunch will be provided. Please email
Fabrice Turpin (f.turpin@uq.edu.au) if you wish to have lunch with the speaker.

Host name: Deirdre Wilson
Host email: neuroseminars@qbi.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

QBI Neuroscience Seminar

Date/Time: Wednesday 31st August 2016 12:00

Location: Level 7 Auditorium

Title of talk: Human saliva: linking oral fluids with systemic diseases
Speaker's name: A/Professor Chamindie Punyadeera
Speaker's organisation: Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Translational Research Institute, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove
Talk abstract: Salivary diagnostics is gaining attention within the medical community, as studies demonstrate that saliva contains virtually all of the same medical diagnostic information as blood. Researchers have also shown changes in salivary hormone and protein levels when a person suffers from a concussion. This happens shortly after head trauma.

It is now becoming evident that there is a strong association between oral and systemic diseases. Inflammation is a key connector between oral disease and systemic diseases. Human saliva functions as a plasma ultra-filtrate and contains 2,340 proteins that are either transported across blood into salivary glands or produced by the salivary glands. The collection of saliva is less invasive compared with taking a blood sample making it very accessible to both patients and clinicians. Saliva is also a medium that is ideal for large population-based screening, potentially providing healthcare systems a more economical approach to detecting heart failure (HF) within the community.

Within our team, we are using saliva as a biological matrix to detect ischemic heart disease and HF. We used AlphaLISA® technology to quantify C-Reactive Protein (CRP) levels in saliva samples collected from controls and cardiac patients. The mean CRP levels in saliva collected from controls was 285 pg/mL and in cardiac patients was 1680 pg/mL (p<0.01). Analysis of CRP concentrations in paired serum and saliva samples from cardiac patients gave a positive correlation (r2 = 0.84, p < 0.001). Similarly, salivary NT-proBNP levels in the healthy controls and HF participants were <16 pg/mL and 76.8 pg/mL, respectively. The salivary NT-proBNP immunoassay showed a clinical sensitivity of 82.2% and specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 83.3%, with an overall diagnostic accuracy of 90.6%.

Saliva is in close proximity to head and neck cancers (HNCs), especially oral cavity cancers and by analysing DNA methylation, miRNA and glycosylation changes in saliva samples, we were able to diagnose HNCs. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation and glycosylation are hallmarks of tumour development. Using the promoter DNA methylation of RASSF1α, DAPK1, and p16 we could discriminate a HNC patient group (n = 143) from a control group (n = 31) with 87% specificity and 80% sensitivity (with a Fisher exact test P < .0001). Using a multi-marker logistic regression analysis, a panel of nine miRNA demonstrated a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 93% (AUC = 0.98) when discriminating saliva collected from patients (n=100) from saliva from precancer patients (n=29). These data support the scientific notion that saliva is an ideal biological medium to detect both oral and systemic events. Further research is warranted before salivary diagnostics enter routine clinical practice.

Other Details: Students and postdocs are encouraged to have lunch with the seminar speaker
at 1.00pm in the Level 7 seminar room. Lunch will be provided. Please email
Fabrice Turpin (f.turpin@uq.edu.au) if you wish to have lunch with the speaker.

Host name: Deirdre Wilson
Host email: neuroseminars@qbi.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

GCI Food Security Discussion Series

Date/Time: Thursday 25th August 2016 13:00-14

Location: GCI Building (20) Rm 275

Title of talk: Book Launch: Australia\'s Role in Feeding the World
Speaker's name: Tor Hundloe
Speaker's organisation: Emeritus Professor, GPEM, UQ
Talk abstract: A lucky land! Australians can feed on an enormous variety of foods grown in their own country. Our favorites such as bananas we can buy every day of the year. We can put a locally caught prawn on the barbie on each of those 365 days. And we have enough surplus food to feed two-and-a-half times our population.\r\nThis book seeks to bring a degree of realism to the much-touted assertion that Australia will become the \"food bowl\" of Asia. Some have gone as far as claiming we will feed the world! Some of us wish we could. Keep in mind that there will be another 2 billion more humans to be fed by 2050.\r\nUndoubtedly, Australia with its clean-green image, will continue to be an important exporter of farmed products as global demand for food increases, but there are serious biophysical, economic, institutional and social constraints on our ability to produce a greatly increased quantity of food for export.\r\nIssues dealt with in the book include: Which overseas markets will dominate? What products will be in high demand? Who are our competitors? What if Australia\'s population continues to grow and the surplus of income-earning food exports diminishes? Are the supreme optimists on the money with visions of opening up the north? What of the negative impacts of over-use of water and fertilisers? What is the relationship between the health of the Great Barrier Reef and agriculture in its catchment? What can we do to reduce waste on the farm? How do we meet changing food preferences? Who is afraid of GMOs? Who likes free-range eggs? Who has the Gold Medal for certified organic farmland and where is it?

Host name: Jane O\'Sullivan
Host phone number: 33798090
Host email: j.osullivan@uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

Genomics of Development and Disease Division special seminar

Date/Time: Thursday 25th August 2016 11:00

Location: QBP Large Seminar Room (3.142)

Title of talk: Skeletal muscle stem cells in regeneration and growth
Speaker's name: Prof Peter Currie
Speaker's organisation: Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute

Host name: A/Prof Ben Hogan
Host email: b.hogan@imb.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

School of Biomedical Sciences

Date/Time: Thursday 25th August 2016 15:00

Location: QBI Auditorium

Title of talk: Analysis of the gene environment interaction in the context of metabolic disease
Speaker's name: Professor David James
Speaker's organisation: Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney

Host name: Dr Brad Launikonis
Host email: b.launikonis@uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

Life Science Seminar

Date/Time: Wednesday 31st August 2016 14:00

Location: AIBN Seminar Room

Title of talk: Differentiating Cells and Immune Checkpoint Cancer Research using Magnetic Cell Separation, Multiplex Assays and Functional Antibodies.
Speaker's name: Miguel Tam
Speaker's organisation: BioLegend
Talk abstract: Research of complex biological problems requires a multi-tool approach and BioLegend is committed to developing a diverse array of reagents to maximize experimental results. Such products include our MojoSort™, a magnetic separation system, LEGENDplex™, a bead-based immunoassay to simultaneously quantify up to thirteen soluble analytes in a single sample, and GoInVivo™, functionally validated antibodies targeting immune checkpoint receptors. Our results indicate that positive selection of CX3CR1 mouse bone marrow precursors differentiate into macrophages or dendritic cells and migrate back to the bone marrow after adoptive transfer. In addition, blockade of PD-L1, and depletion of T cells with functional antibodies contribute to tumor growth reduction in wild type and knockout murine melanoma cancer model.

Other Details: Afternoon tea will be provided. For catering purposes Please RSVP Andrew Rayfield 0404488830 andrew@aust-biosearch.com.au

Host name: Andrew Rayfield
Host phone number: 0404 488 830
Host email: andrew@aust-biosearch.com.au

Seminars | This Week

Inflammasome Mini-Symposium

Date/Time: Tuesday 30th August 2016 13:30

Location: QBP Large Seminar Room

Title of talk: New insights into interleukin-1beta release, inflammasome activation and cell death
Speaker's name: Pablo Pelegrin
Speaker's organisation: Murcia's BioHealth Research Institute

Title of talk: K+ efflux-independent activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome
Speaker's name: Christina Gross
Speaker's organisation: Technische Universität München

Other Details: Speaker #3
Title of talk: Melting ICE: Investigation of Caspase-1 mutant mice
Speaker's name: Olaf Gross
Speaker's organisation: Technische Universität München, Germany

Afternoon tea will be provided following the symposium

Host name: Kate Schroder
Host email: k.schroder@imb.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

CASB Seminar Series

Date/Time: Wednesday 31st August 2016 16:00

Location: Large Seminar Room 3.143

Title of talk: Exploring the bioavailability of natural products in herbal extracts
Speaker's name: Associate Professor Joanne Blanchfield
Speaker's organisation: SCMB-UQ
Talk abstract: Herbal medicines and plant based extracts are the main form of medicines for people in developing nations and a major contributor to health care in developed nations. Australians spend over $4 billion a year on alternative and complementary medicines. For many herbal extracts however, we have not begun to understand the compounds present, their bioactivities and their oral bioavailability. This talk will present recent studies using Caco-2 cells to evaluate the oral bioavailability and metabolic stability of natural products from several herbal extracts including Echinacea, Kava and Chamaelirium luteum¬ (false unicorn). Previously identified steroidal saponins from C. luteum have been examined using the Caco-2 cell monolayer assay to provide predictions of their oral bioavailability. These compounds possess a steroid core decorated with various sugar units in varying positions on the core. Our results suggest an interesting structure activity relationship with the compounds with sugar units on one site of the core being absorbed while compounds with sugars at both ends of the core are not absorbed. The aglycone cores did not pass through the cell membrane to any great extent. Finally, a discussion of the use of Caco-2 cell monolayers to focus isolation efforts for extracts such as Chaste tree and Jiaogulan with very complex mixtures of natural products to those compounds most likely to be biologically active will be presented.

Host name: David Fairlie
Host email: d.fairlie@imb.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

SCMB Chemistry Seminar

Date/Time: Monday 29th August 2016 12:00

Location: AIBN Seminar Room

Title of talk: Reengineering biosynthesis: investigating non-ribosomal peptide synthesis as a pathway to novel natural products
Speaker's name: A/Prof. Max Cryle
Speaker's organisation: Monash University
Talk abstract: Non-ribosomal peptide synthesis is a vital source of many important natural products, including compounds with anticancer (bleomycin), antibiotic (vancomycin), antifungal (echinocandin) and immunosuppressive (cyclosporin) activities. By removing the constraints imposed by ribosome-based synthesis, non-ribosomal peptide synthesis can exploit a range of monomers far greater than standard proteinogenic amino acids: to date, more than 500 different monomers have been identified and these, combined with many further modifications, can have dramatic effects on the structural and biological diversity of these compounds. The enzymatic machinery that produces these compounds is a group of fascinating megaenzyme synthases known as non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Utilising a modular architecture of repeating catalytic domains and combined with multiple interaction partners in trans, NRPSs have long been recognised as potential targets for enzymatic redesign to produce new, bioactive compounds. To date, this research has largely been hindered by a lack of understanding of how NRPSs function: my group aims to overcome these limitations by focusing on the characterisation of specific, important examples of NRPS biosynthesis. In this presentation I will showcase the results of our research on two such systems - glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis and skyllamycin biosynthesis - and show how such studies are being directed towards the eventual production of novel compounds in vivo.

Other Details: Anybody wishing to meet with this speaker may contact Elizabeth Krenske.

Host name: Elizabeth Krenske
Host email: e.krenske@uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

CIDR Forum

Date/Time: Friday 2nd September 2016 09:00

Location: IMB Level 3 large seminar room (3.142)

Title of talk: Targeting CD40-CD154 interactions in transplantation and autoimmune diseases
Speaker's name: James Rush
Speaker's organisation: Novartis

Host name: Kate Schroder
Host email: k.schroder@imb.uq.edu.au

Seminars | This Week

CAI Special Seminar

Date/Time: Tuesday 30th August 2016 13:00

Location: Lvl 2 Seminar room, Centre for Advanced Imaging, Bldg 57

Title of talk: Alfred Nobel and the History of the Nobel Prize
Speaker's name: Prof. Lawrence J Berliner
Speaker's organisation: University of Denver, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Talk abstract: Alfred Nobel was a genius and a keen practioner of many fields, including chemistry, physics, physiology/medicine and literature, which comprise four of the prestigious Nobel Prizes awarded each year since 1901. There is also a rich history of the chemical elements being a key part of the prize citation, starting as early as Marie Curie. This talk covers the history of Alfred Nobel and how he, his father and brothers developed their famous explosive that made Nobel company and Alfred extremely wealthy and famous. However the interesting, sometimes sad part of this history, is how Alfred came about to propos e and write in his will the details of these prizes. Prof. Berliner, who teaches a course on the Nobel Prize to entering freshman undergraduate students at the University of Denver, gives both personal and sensitive insight to its mystique and fame. His lecture will bring in an Australian perspective in the contributions that Australian scholars have made to earn several Nobel prizes. Time permitting, the politics and potential mistakes made by the various Nobel committees over the years will be discussed.

Host name: Lorine Wilkinson
Host phone number: 33460364
Host email: l.wilkinson@uq.edu.au